Journal of Alternative Complementary & Integrative Medicine Category: Medicine Type: Short Communication

Discussion on the Thinking Innovation by the Theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine

Qingyan Zhao1,2,3, Xi Wang1,2,3 and Congxin Huang1,2,3*

1 Department Of Cardiology, Renmin Hospital Of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China
2 Hubei Key Laboratory Of Cardiology, Wuhan, China
3 Cardiovascular Research Institute Of Wuhan University, Renmin Hospital Of Wuhan University, 238 Jiefang Road, Wuhan 430060, China

*Corresponding Author(s):
Congxin Huang
Cardiovascular Research Institute Of Wuhan University, Renmin Hospital Of Wuhan University, 238 Jiefang Road, Wuhan 430060, China
Tel:+86 13871329139,
Fax:+86 2788042292
Email:huangcongxin@vip.163.com, ruyan71@163.com

Received Date: Apr 15, 2019
Accepted Date: Apr 30, 2019
Published Date: May 07, 2019

Abstract

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) views the healthy human body as an entity in yin-yang equilibrium, and the ultimate goal of treatment in TCM is to restore the yin-yang balance. Therefore, the essential principle of treating diseases in TCM is treating diseases mainly by regulating and mediating the imbalance state to dynamic balance and yin-yang harmony. Previous studies have shown that the sympathetic nerve activity and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system plays a key pathophysiologic role in the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Under the guidance of TCM theories and modern technology, we can further reveal the pathogenesis of disease and obtain the new therapeutic treatments.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been attracting more and more attention and receiving an increasing acceptance from a global scope due to its important role in prevention and treatment of diseases [1]. TCM views the healthy human body as an entity in yin-yang equilibrium, and the ultimate goal of treatment in TCM is to restore the yin-yang balance. Therefore, the essential principle of treating diseases in TCM is treating diseases mainly by regulating and mediating the imbalance state to dynamic balance and yin-yang harmony.

Previous studies have shown that the sympathetic nerve activity and Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) plays a key pathophysiologic role in the progres¬sion of choric heart failure and Atrial Fibrillation (AF) [2]. Suppression of the sympathetic nerve activity or RAAS was proven to reduce the combined endpoints of mortality and morbidity in patients with heart failure and prohibit the progression of AF [3,4]. We hypothesis the yin-yang balance in TCM has the similar meanings with the balance in autonomic nerve activity and RAAS. AF belongs to “palpitation” and “syndrome of Chong” category in TCM. TCM believes that the cause of AF is due to “Qi Yin Deficiency”, “heart kidney yang deficiency” lead to heart and kidney failure. We supposed that AF has a closely relationship with the kidney according to these theories. Under the guidance of TCM theories, we investigated the effects of renal denervation on the incidence of AF. We first reported that activity of RAAS increased during short-time rapid atrial pacing, while renal enervation decreased activity of RAAS. The episodes of AF could be decreased bypercutaneous renaldenervation during short-time rapid atrial pacing. These effects might have relationship with decreased activity of RAAS [5]. Furthermore, we also found that renal denervation suppressed the increased levels of circulating hor¬mones and inhibited atrial and ventricular substrate remodeling during rapid atrial or ventricular pacing. The effects might be associated with decreased activity of the RAAS after renal denervation [6,7]. In our study, we found that renaldenervation can attenuate the changes of levels of plasma neurohormones in the activated RAAS and sympathetic nerve system but had not obviously effect in the normal physiology of RAAS and sympathetic nerve system [8]. These results further demonstrate that the theories of treating diseases mainly by regulating and mediating the imbalance state are reasonable.

Acupuncture is a therapeutic modality that emerged from TCM. In clinical practice, it has been recognized that the stimulation of the Neiguan spot has been utilized to treat AF [9]. The Neiguan spot is located in the portion of the Meridian of the Heart Minister situated in the forearm, along the course between the two tendons. This acupointis located overlies the trunk of the median nerve. Therefore, we supposed that the stimulation of the Neiguan acupuncture point mimics median nerve stimulation to exert a modulatory function on the autonomic nervoussystem. In our recent study, we demonstrated that median nerve stimulation substantially prevents atrial electrical remodeling and AF vulnerability [10]. The effects of median nerve stimulation on AF have relationship with regulating and mediating the balance of autonomic nervoussystem.

In our recent study, we found that Neiguan acupuncture combine amiodarone therapy appears to be superior to amiodarone alone in preventing the early recurrences of AF after catheter ablation in patients with persistent AF. The efficacy of Neiguan acupuncture therapy on the early recurrences is associated with decreased inflammation factors. In this study, we found the patient’s heart rate decreased during acupuncturing of Neiguan Points. These results indicated that acupuncturing of Neiguan Point was similar to that of an increase in vagal neural activity [11].

TCM is based on 5000 years of medical practice and experience, and is rich in data from “clinical experiments” which guarantee its effectiveness and efficacy. The theories of TCM contain rich philosophical and humanistic spirit. Under the guidance of TCM theories and modern technology, we suggest that we can further reveal the pathogenesis of disease and obtain the new therapeutic treatments.

Keywords

Traditional Chinese Medicine, Innovation

DISCLOSURE STATEMENT

None

REFERENCES

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  2. Hartupee J, Mann DL (2017) Neurohormonal activation in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Nat Rev Cardiol 14: 30-38.
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  4. Krum H, Teerlink JR (2011) Medical therapy for chronic heart failure. Lancet 378: 713-721.
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  8. Zhao Q, Huang H, Wang X, Wang X, Dai Z, et al. (2014) Changes of serum neurohormone after renal sympathetic denervation in dogs with pacing-induced heart failure. Int J Clin Exp Med 7: 4024-4030.
  9. Lomuscio A, Belletti S, Battezzati PM, Lombardi F (2011) Efficacy of acupuncture in preventing atrial fibrillation recurrences after electrical cardioversion. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 22: 241-247.
  10. Zhao Q, Zhang S, Zhao H, Zhang S, Dai Z (2018) Median nerve stimulation prevents atrial electrical remodelling and inflammation in a canine model with rapid atrial pacing. Europace 20: 712-718.
  11. Yin J, Yang M, Yu S, Fu H, Huang H, et al. (2019) Effect of acupuncture at Neiguan point combined with amiodarone therapy on early recurrence after pulmonary vein electrical isolation in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol.

 

 

Citation: Zhao Q, Wang X, Huang C (2019) Discussion on the Thinking Innovation by the Theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine. J Altern Complement Integr Med 5: 065.

Copyright: © 2019  Qingyan Zhao, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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